old-fashioned southern comfort

Cocktail U is once again in session. Thank you for coming to class this week. If you’ll please take your seats, I’ll first pass platters of Great-aunt Helen’s Grits.

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Baked?

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or Fried?

Our assignment this week was to find a cocktail to accompany these grits from last week’s post. I’ll admit to being stumped for most of the week. Southern fare called for a Southern sipper, though the obvious bourbon has been done so often here. Wasn’t there something else we could whip up?

The answer was in the name: Southern Comfort–of course! But what could we make with this whiskey-flavored liqueur? Turns out a lot. My hefty copy of 10,000 DrinksΒ listed over 300 titles under “Southern Comfort” in the index. Many of them had names not appropriate for a blog such as this (Big Booty Shake and Butt Naked? Maybe not.), which narrowed it down, but still.

But then along came Diane of Diane’s Food Blog. We’d been introduced through a mutual blogging friend (thanks, Shamim!) and had corresponded a bit via email and our respective facebook pages (mine, hers). Imagine my delight when I found myself sitting next to her at a cooking class event held at a local foodie venue. Somehow my Southern Comfort cocktail conundrum came up in conversation and she mentioned her mom liking Southern Comfort Old-Fashioneds. Diane had my attention.southern-comfort-oldfashioned.jpg.jpeg

Being the awesome networker that she is, Diane sent me a “loose version” of her mom’s recipe that same evening. Her comment that she “always thought they taste a bit like cough medicine, but in a good way” had me especially curious. I was missing only the orange and lemon, but as soon as that was remedied I whipped me up a Southern Comfort Old-Fashioned. sc-of.jpg.jpeg

While the base (muddled citrus and sugar, bitters, andΒ  Southern Comfort) was indeed syrupy, the addition of club soda and ice means this cocktail can be diluted to taste. I used a 16-ounce glass and with a few ice cubes and to-the-top fill of bubbly water, my drink was just a bit on the weak side. Next time, I’ll use less club soda. But the overall flavors were fruity and divine. Sweet, tart, and refreshing. It’s nice to know this drink will be waiting in my cocktailΒ  repertoire for the next time I need something sassy and Southern to sip.southern-comfort-old-fashioned.jpg.jpeg

Diane’s loose version of her mom’s recipe is as follows, with the quantities I used in parentheses.

  1. Muddle some sugar (1 cube), lemon (1 wedge) and orange (2 wedges) in the bottom of the glass.
  2. Add some bitters (few dashes).
  3. Add a shot (2 ounces) of Southern Comfort and some club soda (to the top of 16-ounce glass that also holds a few ice cubes).
  4. Garnish with cherries or an orange+cherry skewer.

Many thanks to my bloggy friend, Diane, for finding us the perfect cocktail pairing for grits. Next week we’ll dig back into Great-aunt Helen’s recipe box for another vintage foodie find.

30 thoughts on “old-fashioned southern comfort

  1. I have so many questions now. Are bitters really bitter? Have you tasted them alone, like on the tip of your finger? Why is it called Old-Fashioned? How can a name of a drink just be an adjective? You can’t just call it a New. But I bet if you were to muddle only organic fruits, then it could be a New Old-Fashioned. Or at least a smug one.

    I just like looking at your sliced citrus. So appealing. I feel like you should have a larger version of that purple umbrella, a parasol to twirl whilst you stand on your veranda, Old-Fashioned in the other hand, watching people go by. Now that sounds comforting. Southern Comfort.

    • And do I have answers. Yes. Yes. I don’t know, but could look it up. Dunno. Why not? I suppose.

      Did I cover it all?

      Yes, you are my citrus-y friend. We shall call you the Citrus Queen. Or maybe I shall call you the Citrus Queen whilst I twirl my purple parasol, relaxing on the setee that sits on my veranda. So glad that large elm tree is also providing shade. Indeed I am comforted.

      Alrighty then. To for reals answer your Q: Bitters are made from tree bark and such and are highly bitter – a few drops help balance the sweet and the sour of cocktails. They seem quite the hot and trendy thing these days. Dare I say there are hip?

      As to why an Old-Fashioned is known as such, may I suggest wikipedia? https://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Old_Fashioned I tried to read the page, but quickly got bored. It just is called an Old-Fashioned. Why ask why.

      And a drink can be an adjective just as easily as a noun. It’s all crazy stuff, them cocktail names. Just peruse the index of 10,000 Drinks. Man oh man.

      You are oodles of fun to Comment with πŸ˜€

    • Thank you, Kloe! Must get over your way to see how you’ve been. So much to catch up on. You are well? Good to see your smiling face πŸ™‚

  2. I do love an old-fashioned with bourbon–it’s my go-to cocktail–but I’m not sure about the Southern Comfort. I guess it can’t hurt to try, though!

    • The SC definitely made it sweeter, Kerry. Prefer the old-fashioned old-fashioned as well. But you’re so right that it never hurts to try πŸ™‚ Thanks for coming over! Always good to see you here.

  3. Good for you to come up with a comfortable Southern drink like this to go with our grits, Liz. But, ahem, no thank you. Ever since I over-indulged on that so-sweet Southern Comfort one college party night and lost the big battle for hours the next morning, I’ve sworn off the stuff. Rather, my stomach’s revolution at the thought is answer enough for me. Wow. Over-sharing, speaking of a family blog?

    • Don’t worry about oversharing, Mark. Not necessarily a “family-friendly” blog, but we do like to keep it clean, haha. I hear you on the Southern Comfort college experience. I feel the same about Peach Schnaaps, though it wasn’t a college thing.

    • Not sure why I even have a bottle on hand, but this project almost finished it off and I probably won’t replace it. Why drink a whiskey liqueur when whiskey is an option πŸ™‚ Appreciate you coming round, Gretchen! Thank you for your kind words.

    • You only lost touch because I disappeared! Hard to keep up with everyone that I want to keep up with. Trying to chip away at connecting with folks. Slowly but surely shall be my mantra. Appreciate you being here very much. Yes yes yes, please join me for Happy Hour. Cheers πŸ™‚

      • Liz, thanks for extending me a Mid-Western welcome! I have always felt overwhelmed by blogging in my summers (starting in spring) at warehouse and trying to keep up here. Thinking about cutting back, if I can resist daily conversations! πŸ™‚

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